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Hard To Train??


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#1 TheGreatZoe

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 03:52 PM

I was just wondering are Great Danes any harder to train than any other dog?? I was talking to a friend and she said that her sister was gonna get a Great Dane but that a trainer told her that they were the hardest dog to train so she decided against it. So Are Great Danes any harder or the hardest dog to train??

#2 paintdragonrider

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 03:57 PM

I was told this too. Having training experience with several different dogs, I can honestly say that I find my dane as difficult or easy to train as any other dog, although I must say that I find that he requires a bit more patience. The sentence "it takes a long time for the sit command to go from the ear to the brain to the butt and back" (as was told to me by several proffessional trainers) definately rings true! Every dog is different, even within the same breed..its really just luck of the draw....lol
I do wish you all the best of luck with your new pup!

#3 Dusty

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 04:10 PM


Hi

I have been attending obedience training classes with my Great Dane for a year now, and according to my instructor, we have made the advanced class in record time! I have spoken to other trainers who also claim that Great Danes and impossible to train and will not even allow them in there classes.

I think that you have to start training as soon as you can, and feel that training in a class envioroment works best for us. We tried a few different classes before we found the one we currently attend, as different trainers have different methods, some of which dint suit us.

My dog is quiet stubborn, so it has been hard work, and his size has sometimes made training quite hard, but it has been worth it. Strangers now comment on my dogs behaviour when we are out and about, and I love it!

I think that some dogs are easier to train, i often see amazingly well behaved terriers and Labradors. But at the end of the day you still need to put the effort into training.

Hope this helps

XX

#4 Nikki30

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 04:47 PM

I have never heard that great danes are hard to train! unsure.gif blink.gif I certainly have had no probs with Carla at all, and Scoobs was already very well trained when we got him....... tongue.gif

#5 baranduin

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 04:48 PM

Great Danes are not hard to train. They just take a bit more time and effort than a sheepdog. If they want to please you and are food oriented then if you cut the food back and make them work for it you will be amazed how quickly they learn to do things if their food depends on it . And don't be afraid of withholding the reward-- they are not going to fade away if they miss a meal. Consistency is the key.
Louise

#6 moptop

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 05:41 PM

i have worked in great dane kennels and had my own for too many years to mention and i have never ahd a problem training them, my 2 harly girls now walk almost anywhere off the lead and have done for most of their adult lives, Asrai my young mantle is so full of life that off the lead she will run and run and run but on the but will come back when shouted, the only time i may have a problem with her is if another dog is around she thinks may be fun to play with, but has since the age of approx 6 months been AMAZIN on the lead, i train with lots of praise and very rarely have to be harse with them

#7 hyndricksdad

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 06:59 PM

Great danes are just as easy to train its the culture of not socilizing your dane for the first few mnths and treating them like children that make them so hard to train 6mnths old when most people decide to take them to first class by this time they are huge still only a 6 mnth old puppy but large and clumsey with no socilizing

#8 Dante

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 07:12 PM

I have to say, and please feel free to shoot me tongue.gif, before i had my forst own dane, i thought they were supposed to be quit stupid and damn.... hmmm... how wrong was i....biggrin.gif
I think they are actually easy to train ( maybe not as easy as some breeds but definitely not hard) just like George said, you do have to start early, as by time they are 6 months old, they really are literally handfull and way too strong for their own good.... but easy to train, they are very lovable and affectionate and that makes it easy i think as they do wanna please


Dont worry, you ll be just fine smile.gif

xxxx

B

#9 01gnu

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Posted 11 December 2008 - 08:08 PM

No easier or harder than any other dog I have owned but I would say the training has to be a little different. I have found them to need a more calm and gentle approach and short sessions with variety or they lose interest. Perhaps that's just their individual personality but it seems a big shift from the various gundogs and x breeds we owned before.

Have you seen the video of Porter the Harli and the things he had learned by 9 weeks!? The link is in the training sectiion.


#10 Yvette

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 06:42 AM

Generally speaking a Collie needs a new command repeated four times before they get it, a Great Dane needs that command repeated 40 times before they get it. But that is a generality (piece of research I read), and like with people, some will be smarter and some not so smart.

I have one smart Dane and on who is intellectually challenged laugh.gif laugh.gif

But on the other hand any dog will learn and can be trained, it is the owner that needs most 'training' ... usually if the dogs is not trained well it is the owners fault wink.gif

Yvette
xx


#11 sponsoredbycatfood

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 08:53 AM

I think they're quite easy to train. But when I broke my finger they had 8 weeks of scattered walks because I was only taking them out for a 30 second walk before I let them off in the fields so they didn't have much lead time. As soon as I was taking them both out again for long walks, Phoebe was a complete nightmare and I had to reinforce commands, Koston wasn't too bad but still had to do a bit of training. I think if it's consistent they're fine, it's when they have a break from training that they lose it a bit.

Lisa x

#12 paddysmum

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 02:34 PM

Great danes are ok to train when young as they want to please you and when they are young is the time to do all the work. However they are dominant and stubborn dogs generally as a breed and can be difficult to retrain when adult.... these dogs need a dominent firm consistant handler.
Any lapses in training when young will show at around 12-15mths when they come into their own. Or when the hormones kick in haha

#13 funkymonkeyf

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 05:53 PM

I think as long as you start young and stick to wot you are training them they are great and pick up things easy. Its more important to get them trained due to size, my dane was fantastic in and out the house my british bulldog on the other hand could do with a atint in dog borstal he is stubborn and does wot he likes so give me a dane any day

Mandy x


#14 bluebelle

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 01:21 PM

After training 6 Danes I can only say they always made me proud,they always ended in the top 5 of their class.Our first Dane was 3 when we got her,or she got us tongue.gif ,but she learned quickly and was very well behaved after training.Xanttha was 7 months and a handfull,she would lean against my leg and if I stepped away would come sit there again or she would just fall down.She was bored easily,since the trainster didn't offer any advice or help solving this I finally quit but kept on working with her at home and she too became a well behaved Dane.People always were amazed at how well behaved our Danes were,but I do agree: you have to start right away when your puppy comes home with you.We started with walking on the lead,when on the lead no pulling or walking in front of you,they have to walk right next to you.
Lily

#15 Hsin-Yi

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 09:37 PM

How funny - the article I'm working on for Dogs Today at the moment is all about "difficult to train" breeds although the focus has been on other 'notorious' breeds, such as Beagles and Huskies - not Danes.

Definitely starting young - but that goes for any dog. Waiting until 6 months to start training is a joke, in my opinion, besides setting yourself a difficult challenge on purpose because by then, the puppy has already learnt several bad habits and is also starting to be more independent and easily distracted (learning will of their own) and less likely to want to work with owner - teenage time...Puppies are craving to be trained and there is nothing that says they can't cope with training from very young. Guide dog puppies starts learning commands from as young as 6 weeks.

I guess I am biased because I have never let the fact that I own a Dane stop me from doing all the things I wanted to do in training - Honey does Obedience, Agility, Rally and Canine Freestyle and while she may never be as quick or as precise as the collies, she certainly knows her commands as well and is as "obedient" - I can heel her off-leash in a park full of dogs, heel her off-leash past cats, drop her into an instant Down when she is in a full run and recall her back from anything, including in full play with other dogs. I have left her in a Down Stay and gone out of sight for over 1/2hr, trained her to only toilet in one spot in the garden, ring a bell to ask to go out and never enter the kitchen (open plan, no door) - don't get me wrong, it has been a lot of work to get her to this level but it can be done.

And it isn't because Honey is "special" - she can be hard work and needs authority - I've had trainers tell me that in other hands, she would probably have ended up a 'problem dog' - the seeds are definitely there! smile.gif But I've managed to channel that into her training and learnt how to handle her to my benefit - it is just about consistency and repetition. And yes, a bit more effort and patience - and creativity in training methods.

The big difference I would say is that Danes don't have as much innate "drive" as other working breeds - it's not that they don't want to please you but they are so laid back in general and quite happy to laze around that they don't have a desperate urge to be doing something continuously - it's too much hard work! smile.gif And you know how much Danes hate anything which requires effort! smile.gif So whereas you have your Collie following you around, panting, tongue out, going "What can I do? What can I do? What can I do? What's next? " - your Dane is probably going "Hm...where can I lie down and have a good snooze?". You have to work harder to motivate them and keep training sessions shorter - the Dane brain can't take much in one go. They don't have such a strong drive to work and do stuff.

Also, I find that it works better if you find out what motivates your Dane (eg, food, cuddles, favourite toy) rather than just try to use physical intimidation to get them to listen. I'm not one of those touchy-feely new age training types who never believe in discipline - I do use discipline in certain situations - but I find in general for training that as Danes are often "soft" dogs, if you discipline them - they just shut down - they start trying to do as little as possible because they're scared of you and they get really subdued and move really slowly and become like a "lump" and are even less likely to follow your directions. So you usually get better results with jollying them up and getting them to work for rewards. Foood is generally very effective - the problem with most people is that they either overfeed their dogs (keep them a bit hungry - better for their health and better for your training!) or they use really boring treats.

A lot of time, training isn't just about the specific session when you're teachign commands but your overall authority over your Dane, which comes from everyday routines and maintaining control over resources, making your dog earn everything, get permission from you, etc - this gives you greater authority overall and will make your dog respond better when you're actually doing a formal training session.

Hsin-Yi

#16 sueb

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 08:00 AM

Just to add, I have always found my Danes relatively easy to train.... but because of their temperaments need a lot of socialisation and boundary skills reinforcement whilst young to enable them to grow into happy and confident adults. Many also become very delinquent, head strong teenagers... coupled with their predisposition to be protective and possessive can make for a pretty potent mix laugh.gif When they are well socialised, trained and have gone through the teenage angst, will then mature into the most beautiful, loving and well behaved adults... an absolute pleasure and an honour to live with wub.gif

#17 Stig Martin Andersen

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 07:54 PM

I have experience with several kinds of breeds, Great Danes are one of the easiest I have trained. I use finger snapping and hand gestures to command Thor. Just remember too encourage and praise good behaviour rather than scolding bad behaviour.



#18 sarah-001

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 11:58 AM

I don't believe that Danes are hard to train............ I have attended both socialisation and obedience training classes with Ted since he was a pup...... and, I have to admit that at first - he wasn't what I would call an 'A' student - he was easily distracted and got bored just as quickly............
I believe that the trick is to keep initial training sessions short...... when he's had enough... stop - there is no point trying to carry it on....... I think that's when it starts to border on bulllying...... they do not respond well to that.... who does!
Also. not all dogs are the same.... Ted is highly excitable.... start talking in a high or excitable voice... he thinks 'game-on'!! But - he is treat driven - I can have him doing cart wheels at the mere suggestion of a piece of cheese!!
You've also got to remember that it is alot to do with the handling ....... as you become more confident - so do they - you literally learn togather... great for bonding too!!

Sarah x

#19 shadowcat

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 07:06 PM

ALFIE HAS BEEN GOING TO TRAINING FOR OVER A YEAR NOW HAVING PASSED BEGINNERS,INTERMEDIATE 1 AND 2 IS NOW IN THE ADVANCED CLASS AND WON THE TROPHY FOR THE BEST INTERMEDIATE 1 IN THE SOUTH DEVON AREA THIS WAS ALL DUE THE THE TIME AND PATIENCE OF OUR WONDERFUL TAINER AT CLASSES WHO REALISES THAT DANES TAKE TIME TO CARRY OUT COMMANDS AND DO HAVE CAPABILITIES ALFIE HAS JUST WON A ROSSETTE A SPECIAL AWARD FOR ALWAYS STEPPING UP TO NEXT CHALLENGE WE HAVE JUST STARTED AGILITY AND WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGH A 10.5 STONE GREAT DANE COULD WEAVE IN OUT AND OF CONES SET AT A DISTANCE APART FOR HIS COLLIE CLASS MATES IT ALSO HELPS THET ALFIE IS A BIT OF A SHOWMAN AND LOVES AN AUDIENCE.

#20 gailandbenson

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 08:33 PM

QUOTE (shadowcat @ Mar 31 2009, 07:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
ALFIE HAS BEEN GOING TO TRAINING FOR OVER A YEAR NOW HAVING PASSED BEGINNERS,INTERMEDIATE 1 AND 2 IS NOW IN THE ADVANCED CLASS AND WON THE TROPHY FOR THE BEST INTERMEDIATE 1 IN THE SOUTH DEVON AREA THIS WAS ALL DUE THE THE TIME AND PATIENCE OF OUR WONDERFUL TAINER AT CLASSES WHO REALISES THAT DANES TAKE TIME TO CARRY OUT COMMANDS AND DO HAVE CAPABILITIES ALFIE HAS JUST WON A ROSSETTE A SPECIAL AWARD FOR ALWAYS STEPPING UP TO NEXT CHALLENGE WE HAVE JUST STARTED AGILITY AND WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGH A 10.5 STONE GREAT DANE COULD WEAVE IN OUT AND OF CONES SET AT A DISTANCE APART FOR HIS COLLIE CLASS MATES IT ALSO HELPS THET ALFIE IS A BIT OF A SHOWMAN AND LOVES AN AUDIENCE.


That's fabulous...well done biggrin.gif