Jump to content







Photo

Chasing Sheep!

and learning NOT to

  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Sukaso

Sukaso

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 324 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 06:34 PM

Now we have quite a selection of dogs (5 at the moment) and each every one is very different in character. Even the three Danes, Wallace, Bismarck and Cosmo are very unlike each other in many ways. Cosmo is still very young 6.5 months but has done a fabulous job so far in terms of training and shows a lot of eagerness to please.
Bismarck (19 months) is a true couch potato - he has the occasional zoomie session but generally is very easy 'to steer' ad control. Wallace (26 months) is a true MACHINE!
He certainly has a fair amount of the foundation Dane still in him and is a passionate hunter. He also has an astounding stamina and regularly goes out for long distance cross-country runs with MOH (with his vets permission!).
He goes mental when one of us outs our running shoes on and he will clear tree trunks and fences like a show jumper. When out in the wild, he is in his element - truly.

Now this has meant that A LOT of hours of training have been spent on the blue gentlemen. He does learn quite quickly, but he is a cheeky chap and WILL seize the moment if he sees a chance. He is perfect with people and other dogs big, small, flufffy the lot, BUT I would never ever trust him around sheep, deer etc.

To cut a long story short, we have been working up to today for a LONG time. This morning we put our hard work to the test and put the cat amongst the pigeons - or in better words, put the Dane amongst the sheep. And what a good job Wally did!
We only used a bottle filled with pebbles that we rattled to correct unwanted behaviour. For safety, he also wore a remote spray collar that we had purchased for the occasion, however we did not have to use it. Note that he did try to have a go towards the end of the clip but was quite easily corrected with two rattles.

P.S. Needless to say that we had permission from the farmer.

Enjoy

Posted Image



Suzy xxx

#2 dhclark

dhclark

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 337 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:06 PM

Lottie is also a hunting machine but unfortunately this can include dogs occasionally! Cats are a favourite and squirrels are the best of the bunch! Oddly enough its only when they move! If we take her up the stables onlead with the horses in the stables then she is fine and will meet them over the door not a problem! If she is in the car and they are moving then all hell breaks loose and on lead with them loose she's hard work! I have seen her clear a 4ft fence from standing in pursuit of a pheasant!

So massive congrats on getting him to where you have as it can't have been easy! Long old slog with lottie with her being a rescue but it must almost be harder for you as he's always been with you? Our fred is sooo different though and although he might give chase to something he isn't hunting just desperately wanting to go and say hello!

David

#3 DeeDee

DeeDee

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3,738 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:20 PM

Now we have quite a selection of dogs (5 at the moment) and each every one is very different in character. Even the three Danes, Wallace, Bismarck and Cosmo are very unlike each other in many ways. Cosmo is still very young 6.5 months but has done a fabulous job so far in terms of training and shows a lot of eagerness to please.
Bismarck (19 months) is a true couch potato - he has the occasional zoomie session but generally is very easy 'to steer' ad control. Wallace (26 months) is a true MACHINE!
He certainly has a fair amount of the foundation Dane still in him and is a passionate hunter. He also has an astounding stamina and regularly goes out for long distance cross-country runs with MOH (with his vets permission!).
He goes mental when one of us outs our running shoes on and he will clear tree trunks and fences like a show jumper. When out in the wild, he is in his element - truly.

Now this has meant that A LOT of hours of training have been spent on the blue gentlemen. He does learn quite quickly, but he is a cheeky chap and WILL seize the moment if he sees a chance. He is perfect with people and other dogs big, small, flufffy the lot, BUT I would never ever trust him around sheep, deer etc.

To cut a long story short, we have been working up to today for a LONG time. This morning we put our hard work to the test and put the cat amongst the pigeons - or in better words, put the Dane amongst the sheep. And what a good job Wally did!
We only used a bottle filled with pebbles that we rattled to correct unwanted behaviour. For safety, he also wore a remote spray collar that we had purchased for the occasion, however we did not have to use it. Note that he did try to have a go towards the end of the clip but was quite easily corrected with two rattles.

P.S. Needless to say that we had permission from the farmer.

Enjoy

Posted Image



Suzy xxx


Congratulation wonderful when all your hard work comes together
Well done to you both

DD & Millie

#4 frosty april

frosty april

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 10,056 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:24 PM

Phew,,, you had me worried.
Brilliant work.
Well done for all your hard work.

My only worry was,,,a spray collar would NOT have actually stopped the chase.
Did this not worry you a all?

I admire your trust and commend you on it.
Not having a go,,just curious.

Owning a dog that is UN trust worthy around any livestock,
I am always interested in these kind of posts.

Well done.
Xxxx


#5 kristal

kristal

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,629 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:43 PM

That is very impressive and you must have worked really hard, congratulations to you and congratulations to your boy for showing such great self control.

#6 dhclark

dhclark

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 337 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:32 PM

Just out of interest who's sheep are they?

#7 SausageDog

SausageDog

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1,536 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 10:04 PM

Wow, brilliant. Well done Wallace and well done you for putting in all the hard work to train him. I'll have to ask you for some tips as Jazz likes to chase anything that moves!!

#8 buddy

buddy

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6,221 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 10:51 PM

Thats amazing Suzy, well done to you (and hubby?)
i know instinct and chase are the hardest things to correct- our Honey was a sheep chaser we were told when we got her,
but we chose the easy or cheat option and just made sure we never went near any.
your dedication to your dogs and their training is so inspiring.
well done again.

#9 smj

smj

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,537 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 11:50 PM

Well done for all the hard work and training , it certainly has paid off :)

Sandra Harley & Star xxx

#10 drools

drools

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,129 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 01:14 AM

Congratulations to you and Wallace, he is a real credit to you and the breed, and you are a real credit to Wallace and your other dogs. I can't imagine how much work you have put in to this training.

Carol, Pete, Sasha (sheep/cat/squirrel, etc chaser) & Amy

#11 Sukaso

Sukaso

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 324 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 09:22 AM

Thank you everyone for the wonderful and kind comments! It does make one so happy when all the hard work finally pays off!

Hi Lizzy, I Think you are right in as much as being an animal at the end of the day we can NEVER trust them 100 percent. I guess in the end its a judgement call that one makes.
As mentioned, we had worked up to this for a long time and I think the key when training dogs certain things is not tonset the dog up for faliure i.e. not to get over-confident too quickly but equally to take small risks every now and again when the time is right.
The video shows what Wallace was capable of in the end however before we had him off lead, in the sit- stay amongst the sheep and recalling him into the flock etc, we did a lot testing and watching his behaviour on lead and at an increasingly short distance to the sheep.
Even during the moment when he did go towards the sheep I did not panic as I could see from his body language after the first ratttle that the attempt was half-hearted.
I think going into a situation like this one HAS to be confident and in control - otherwise the dog will feel the insecurity and this can end in tears.

Just out of interest who's sheep are they?


Hi there, they belong to a farmer friend of ours. He has working Collies as well so the sheep are used to dogs. This was important to us in order to minimise the stress for the sheep whilst we were working with Wally. We had the farmer's full consent and support.

BTW, I would never have any of our dogs of lead when sheep are around. I believe that for the majority of dogs, sheep are a very obvious and easy taget. They panic very easily and smell of fear. They also tend to run erratically and are NOT fast. Lastly, their skin is so thin that even the smallest of dogs could break it easily when getting to one. As such - and apart from the fact that legally dogs have to be on lead and under close control amongst other peoples live-stock anyway, I would feel this to be an uneccessary risk to take. Training this situation however gives me the confidence that Wally and me can hopefully master and work well through the more unexpected encounters of wildlife that happen on our walks
The training of Wally ( and our other dogs ) is long not over and will of course also continue - sadly I find you are never really 'done' with it. BUT we enjoy it hugely so it's all part of the fun!
On that note, we had Bismarck with us yesterday as well, although he really did not need any testing. He is totally un-interested in hunting. Well he got into the field, then had one sniff in the air and then walked towards the sheep. When they started running he panicked and ran back to the gate. Had I not let him out of the field, I swear the sheep would have cornered him there!


Suzy xxx

#12 dhclark

dhclark

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 337 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 09:45 AM

Oh bless him and his sheep phobia! Wish i knew someone locally who would let me use their sheep as guinea pigs! The closest i can get to a sheep is a small dartmoor pony that is about dane size! x

#13 sully

sully

    Member

  • Admin
  • Pip
  • 83,594 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:55 PM

That's amazing, well done :)

#14 Danedeer

Danedeer

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,315 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 01:34 PM

Fantastic. You have worked hard and it's paid off.
I think it might have been in the James Herriot stories - a sheep-chasing dog was cured by putting it in a pen with a nasty ram who butted it and the dog became terrified of sheep. Your method is based on your Dane's obedience to you, which is brill. Can't help thinking that Fenton would benefit from some of your training :)


#15 Hgillihan

Hgillihan

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 176 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 01:55 PM

I saw a brilliant video of a Dane "herding" sheep once. Is that something you could try with Wallace, or would he just try to EAT them?! Just curious...

#16 Sukaso

Sukaso

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 324 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 07:59 PM

Hi Heather, couldn't say for other Danes but Wallace' is certainly not looking to herd the sheep and I don't think he could be trained to do so. I believe it's first and foremost the chasing that gets him going but I doubt that if he actually got one, he would leave it alone. I would expect him to act instinctively and and kill it.
Well one thing is for certain, I hope I will never have to find out what exactly his intentions are!

Suzy xxx

#17 kimscot

kimscot

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,650 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 08:10 PM

Well done that boy.. :D
Great work Suzy..
Kim x

#18 buddy

buddy

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6,221 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:25 PM

Bismarck sounds like Horace- i think he would be more scared than the sheep!
He used to be interested in horses running on the beach but as he has matured 'slightly', he has lost interest,
however, we still call him and put his lead on untill they pass.

#19 scoobydoobydoo

scoobydoobydoo

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,557 posts

Posted 21 January 2013 - 10:46 AM

That is brilliant. Well done for all the hard work and all the training , it certainly has paid off :)

#20 Sukaso

Sukaso

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 324 posts

Posted 23 January 2013 - 07:40 AM

Thank you Kim and Patsy! :)

Suzy xxx